Wednesday, 1 July 2015

Audrey Yeo (01) for 06/07/15

1st July 2015

PM Lee's lawyers seek 'very high' damages in defamation case against Roy Ngerng

http://www.straitstimes.com/singapore/courts-crime/pm-lees-lawyers-seek-very-high-damages-in-defamation-case-against-roy-ngerng

The issue being discussed about is that a blogger named Roy Ngerng had wrongly accused Prime Minister Mr Lee Hsien Loong of embezzlement of state investment fund GIC and raising inappropriate questions on the Central Province Funds. Mr Lee filed a lawsuit  against him saying that he had defamed him and did not want to accept his insincere apology letters.

There are several cases of people who make false statements and criticise at the government and ministers (such as the Amos Yee's case when Yee announced the passing of Mr Lee Kuan Yew even though he was not yet dead at that time) through the Internet platforms such as blogs and YouTube videos. I feel that it is alright to share your opinions with other people on the internet however, we must be clear of what we are able to say and post about and what we are not. For example, make false accusation against anything government or political related if we do not have any evidence to prove what we write about. It is disappointing to see how 'uneducated' Singaporeans are for not being able to realize or know what are the severe consequences for doing so. I hope we are able to lessen these kind of cases by making people be aware of what is against the law when on the Internet. 

2 comments:

  1. In Singapore, we are free to express our opinions. However, we would have to be responsible for what we say if it goes to the extent to damaging the reputation of prominent figures. Very often, views and opinions of net users are expressed freely on social media. However, what they say are all claims because they do not view things with an open mind. Their tendency to look to only one side of things resulted in false accusations in black and white and that can bring about intense response from readers. Therefore, in a country like Singapore where freedom of speech in not entirely granted, we must be more cautious of what we say.

    ReplyDelete
  2. In Singapore, we are free to express our opinions. However, we would have to be responsible for what we say if it goes to the extent to damaging the reputation of prominent figures. Very often, views and opinions of net users are expressed freely on social media. However, what they say are all claims because they do not view things with an open mind. Their tendency to look to only one side of things resulted in false accusations in black and white and that can bring about intense response from readers. Therefore, in a country like Singapore where freedom of speech in not entirely granted, we must be more cautious of what we say.

    ReplyDelete