Monday, 10 August 2015

Zhou Wei (24)

http://www.straitstimes.com/singapore/environment/singapores-water-supply-where-does-it-come-from

General Information: Lower rainfall in Singapore and Malaysia is affecting Singapore's water supply. There was 25 per cent less rainfall in the first half of this year, which reduced the main source of water to Singapore's 17 reservoirs. And water levels at Johor's Linggiu Reservoir, which enables the reliable abstraction of raw water from Johor River, are at a historic low.

While Malaysia has been an important source of water for Singapore, the country has been investing in research and development to create alternative sources of water over the years. So where does Singapore get the estimated 400 million gallons a day that it consumes?

According to the national water agency PUB, Singapore had just two water sources 50 years ago. Today, there are four, and the water supply can be divided into "four national taps": local catchment water, imported water, NEWater and desalinated water.

Response: I feel that Singapore's water sources need to be increased till it can accommodate our uses by the time Malaysia and Singapore's water contract is over. I also feel that our uses of water can also be decreased as we living in this country where we do not face water shortage will naturally be not as water saving as other countries, resulting in large amounts of water being wasted away. I also feel that by the time the contract with Malaysia ended, science technology would have been advanced enough to have another national tap created, so as to meet all our needs even if it did not rain for a long time.

1 comment:

  1. I feel we should not solely just depend on our water supply from Malaysia, and we should start depending more on the other three national taps; NEWater, desalinated water and water form reservoirs. Also, our water contract with Malaysia will expire eventually. It is concerning that our water supplies might all dry up as the global temperatures increase annually. If Singapore's population continues growing, there might now be enough water to go around for everyone to drink.

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